Stay In Your Own Lane

Stay in your own lane. Need I say more?

I heard this quote on the radio today. It rang so true, as the saying seems to epitomize life lately. As you shake your head when others want to focus on you, versus growing themselves, keep this quote handy – and just smile…And as another saying goes-aside from sweep your side of the street, stay in your own lane. Need I say more?

YOGA TEACHER VS YOGA THERAPIST – WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

As Yoga therapy evolves, the IAYT, recognized as the as the governing body for yoga therapists based on evidenced-based practice and peer reviewed literature, standards of practice that differentiate between a Yoga therapist and Yoga teacher are now emerging.

The International Association of Yoga Therapists defines Yoga therapy as, …The appropriate application of these teachings and practices in a therapeutic context in order to support a consistent yoga practice that will increase self-awareness and engage the client/student’s energy in the direction of desired goals. The goals of yoga therapy include eliminating, reducing, or managing symptoms that cause suffering; improving function; helping to prevent the occurrence or reoccurrence of underlying causes of illness; and moving toward improved health and wellbeing. Yoga therapy also helps clients/students change their relationship to and identification with their condition. The practice of yoga therapy requires specialized training and skill development to support the relationship between the client/student and therapist and to effect positive change for the individual.

While this sounds like what you may be experiencing at your Yoga studio or medical/wellness clinic, under the guidance of your Yoga teacher, there is a fine line that is greater than it appears. In addition to completing at minimum a 200- hour yoga teacher training, ideally credentialed through Yoga Alliance, a Yoga therapist has also completed at least an additional 300 hours of Yoga therapy training, through a formal Yoga therapy training program, which was begun prior to January 1, 2014 plus at least 150 hours of Yoga therapy client contact hours (applied and submitted to IAYT for approval by June 30, 2017.

If the Yoga practitioner has started a formal Yoga therapy training program January 1, 2014 or later, 800 hours of an International Association of Yoga Therapists (IAYT) Accredited Program are required for full certification as a Yoga therapist. Each pathway requires documentation and full description/proof of required hours for approval by IAYT.

Yoga therapy education requires a foundational understanding of yoga theory and practice, biomedical and psychological foundations, teaching and therapeutic skills, yoga therapy tools and their application, along with professional practice that includes legal, regulatory, ethical issues pertaining specifically to Yoga therapy. All Yoga therapy applicants must be current IAYT members and agree to the Code of Ethics, Grounds for Disciplinary Action and Use of the C-IAYT Credential, and review the Scope of Practice.

That said, Yoga Alliance Registry’s Code of Conduct includes the following commitment, binding on all registrants in that no Yoga Alliance Registered Yoga School (RYS) or Registered Yoga Teacher (RYT) may rely on or use their RYS or RYT designations to hold themselves out as qualified to work as a “Yoga therapist” or to train others in “Yoga therapy” methods. Only a Certified International Association of Yoga Therapist can train others in Yoga therapy and through an IAYT accredited program.

In marketing or advertising materials that are independent of the Registry directory, an RYT or RYS that references “Yoga therapy” services or training must identify the source (other than Yoga Alliance Registry) of certification, accreditation, licensure, or other credential on which they base their “Yoga therapy” offerings.

As Yoga therapy evolves, the IAYT, recognized as the as the governing body for yoga therapists based on evidenced-based practice and peer reviewed literature, standards of practice that differentiate between a Yoga therapist and Yoga teacher are now emerging.

 

For those interested in Yoga therapy for eating disorders, whether or not your ultimate goal is a C-IAYT credential, please join us in Nicaragua in February 2018-more information here!

Yoga & Nutrition

She introduced herself, and only years later did I realize how sisterly we were. It was Beverly Price – a dietitian-yoga teacher blending the two to help people with eating disorders.

Recently, I had the honor of speaking to the Michigan Association of Nutrition and Dietetics on Yoga and Nutrition. My colleague, Annie B Kay is also a pioneer in this field and wanted to share her blog on Yoga Therapy in Dietetics.

Annie states in her blog, “Those of you who have known me for a while know that I have been combining nutrition with yoga since before there was so much great science explaining the mechanisms of why it’s helpful. Yoga, it turns out, makes us better choice-makers. Yoga also creates an internal biochemistry that calms inflammation and when practiced regularly can be protective against chronic disease.”

Read the entire blog post here: 

 

Climbing the Mountain of Life

Mountains are like life. As you climb your way up, you will encounter many challenges.

As I climbed Cathedral Rock, a famous landmark Mountain in Sedona, Arizona, this past March with my daughter and her friend, I reflected back on the past year. I went from transitioning a thriving business, that I had built from the ground up, to leaving it behind with new caretakers as I began to move forward onto the next phase of my life. Although not easy at first, I realized that the letting go process was an important step in this transition. What seemed to be harsh moments were actually gifts in disguise, as I embraced each wave with gratitude.

As I move into this next chapter, I now understand my “next” and trust that my life experience will serve me in the face of any challenge. As you take this all in, you too may be at the next crossroad with many decisions ahead. Know and understand the following:

Mountains are like life. As you climb your way up, you will encounter many challenges. Stay with your intention – believe in yourself. You may encounter loose gravel that may cause you to slip and derail you. Don’t go down that path. Follow the path on the mountain that is made of solid and sturdy rocks, as these are the foundation of the mountain’s integrity. Stay in your truth.

On your climb, forces of collusion may try to shift your balance, while the elements that you once thought were your support, are now your foe. Know that what appear to be adversities are truly powerless as they operate in fear. Be aware of your surroundings – know who and what you can and cannot trust. Remember that as you remain authentic, substantial ground will support you and on your path, you will attract same.

Mountain climbing, like life, is not a destination, but a journey to be enjoyed.

Where is Beverly?

It is said that Yogini’s don’t grow old, but grow wiser. I hope that you will find wisdom in my writings and look forward to keeping in touch through my blog…

Hello and welcome to my blog!

I wanted to update you as to the acquisition of my business, the Inner Door Center, Eating Disorder Treatment Center this past September 2016. Recently, I have left the center, yet still plan to remain active in the national and local Eating Disorder professionals community through consulting, lecturing, board positions, supervising and mentoring, along with taking time for myself.

Through my certification as a Yoga Therapist (C-IAYT) through the International Association of Yoga Therapists, I will be offering Yoga therapy specialty training programs in eating disorders, as affiliated with Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapy. I hope you will join me on my next retreat in Nicaragua, February 2018.

In addition, through my credentialing as an International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals (iaedp) Certified Eating Disorder Registered Dietitian Supervisor (CEDRD-S), I am available to provide supervision to registered dietitians on the traditional path to becoming a CEDRD.

It is said that Yogini’s don’t grow old, but grow wiser. I hope that you will find wisdom in my writings and look forward to keeping in touch through my blog, along with website and other social media outlets.

Sincerely,

Beverly