Eating Disorder Recovery and Getting the Most out of Your Yoga

Yoga is becoming an integral part of eating disorder treatment whether you are struggling with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder and regardless if you are in a residential, partial or outpatient level of care.

Your client’s relationship with food and all other relationships parallels their experience on their Yoga Mat.

via ED Recovery and Getting the Most Out of Your Yoga

On and Off the Mat with Beverly Price, RD, MA, E-RYT 200, C-IAYT, CEDRD-S | MemberSHARE

For your client with an eating disorder, the benefits of yoga can be a powerful tool to uncover attachments and move these individuals forward with awareness. By observing and recording body language, including the client’s resistance, the Yoga therapist can become in tune to what is going on with the client in the moment and consult with the treatment team.

For your client with an eating disorder, the benefits of yoga can be a powerful tool to uncover attachments and move these individuals forward with awareness.  By observing and recording body language, including the client’s resistance, the Yoga therapist can become in tune to what is going on with the client in the moment and consult with the treatment team.

via On and Off the Mat with Beverly Price, RD, MA, E-RYT 200, C-IAYT, CEDRD-S | MemberSHARE

“To the Bone” – Professional Review of the Netflix Movie

All in all, To the Bone focused on recovery, while it has initiated the needed conversation around eating disorders and its addictive nature. If we continue to shove this topic under the rug – this disease that affects millions of individuals – then we perpetuate its “disorder,” and it becomes as secretive as the sickness itself.

We glorify movies that highlight shootings, killings and violence. Shows featuring those addicted to drugs and alcohol are now mainstream. When it comes to documentaries about individuals struggling with eating disorders, these features become the white elephant in the room.

In the eating disorder community, there has been much drama around the recently released, To the Bone, featuring Lily Collins and Keanu Reeves. The greatest concern has been the potential of the film to “trigger” those who are currently struggling with an eating disorder.

As a certified eating disorder specialist, who previously owned and operated an eating disorder treatment center prior to its acquisition, our former treatment team would not walk on eggshells to prevent our clients from being “triggered.” Triggers are a part of everyday life, and it is the job of a competent professional working in an eating disorder treatment setting to acclimate clients to triggers. Triggers are not bad, they exist to push our clients to become aware, along with grow and transform.

If you feel your clients will be triggered by watching this and similar documentaries, ask yourself:

“What makes you uncomfortable as a treatment professional, and why?”, “What do you identify personally with in the respective triggers?”, and “Are you invested in the recovery process of your clients?”

When informational programs regarding diabetes and/or heart disease are featured on television, do medical professionals become concerned that these programs could trigger those individuals who are afflicted with these conditions? I think not.  Our clients with eating disorders don’t walk around with blinders. We are not shielding them from anything they don’t already know.

Our clients want to be pushed. They don’t want to be handled with kid-gloves. It is our job to continue push their buttons. An astute eating disorder practitioner is not one that receives rave reviews because they were good listeners and colluded with their patients. A skilled eating disorder professional receives reviews that exude, “My therapist/doctor challenged me and pushed me out of my comfort zone. I often left our session in tears…and gained insight.”

The film did not clarify for the audience what was unconventional about Dr. Beckham’s treatment approach. In addition, although diversity of individuals with eating disorders were portrayed – vs the stereotype – along with eating disorders across the spectrum, Anorexia Nervosa was still highlighted as the top of the food chain per usual.

All in all, To the Bone focused on recovery, while it has initiated the needed conversation around eating disorders and its addictive nature. If we continue to shove this topic under the rug – this disease that affects millions of individuals – then we perpetuate its “disorder,” and it becomes as secretive as the sickness itself.

New Jersey Administrative Law Judge Rules in Favor of Kantor & Kantor Client in Eating Disorder Case

If you are an eating disorder treatment professional, Lisa Kantor  is an important person to know. We are all advocates on behalf of our patients, who need to focus on treatment, while we fight for their care.

Eating disorders professionals, when providing insurance-based treatment, need to check benefits thoroughly and document who they spoke to–checking twice is not a bad idea to determine any inconsistencies in the health plan reporting of benefits. Document the health plan representatives that you spoke with, including date, time and reference number.

When you admit the patient to your program or service, make sure to obtain the health plan document from the patient – the long 100 plus page document – that the health plan is required to provide the patient. The patient can also obtain this from their human resource department.

Previously, I was a guest blogger on Lisa Kantor’s blog when I as the owner of an eating disorders treatment center.  You can read more tips here on the blog that I wrote regarding advocating for your patient.

I have also shared Lisa Kantor’s recent victory in the link below – how appropriate for the upcoming Independence Day holiday where in our frame of reference, this type of victory is in fact a large step to our own internal freedom. Enjoy your holiday!

Kantor & Kantor, LLP provides exceptional representation for clients who need help with ERISA and insurance claims. Call our California attorneys today.

Source: New Jersey Administrative Law Judge Rules in Favor of Kantor & Kantor Client in Eating Disorder Case

YOGA TEACHER VS YOGA THERAPIST – WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

As Yoga therapy evolves, the IAYT, recognized as the as the governing body for yoga therapists based on evidenced-based practice and peer reviewed literature, standards of practice that differentiate between a Yoga therapist and Yoga teacher are now emerging.

The International Association of Yoga Therapists defines Yoga therapy as, …The appropriate application of these teachings and practices in a therapeutic context in order to support a consistent yoga practice that will increase self-awareness and engage the client/student’s energy in the direction of desired goals. The goals of yoga therapy include eliminating, reducing, or managing symptoms that cause suffering; improving function; helping to prevent the occurrence or reoccurrence of underlying causes of illness; and moving toward improved health and wellbeing. Yoga therapy also helps clients/students change their relationship to and identification with their condition. The practice of yoga therapy requires specialized training and skill development to support the relationship between the client/student and therapist and to effect positive change for the individual.

While this sounds like what you may be experiencing at your Yoga studio or medical/wellness clinic, under the guidance of your Yoga teacher, there is a fine line that is greater than it appears. In addition to completing at minimum a 200- hour yoga teacher training, ideally credentialed through Yoga Alliance, a Yoga therapist has also completed at least an additional 300 hours of Yoga therapy training, through a formal Yoga therapy training program, which was begun prior to January 1, 2014 plus at least 150 hours of Yoga therapy client contact hours (applied and submitted to IAYT for approval by June 30, 2017.

If the Yoga practitioner has started a formal Yoga therapy training program January 1, 2014 or later, 800 hours of an International Association of Yoga Therapists (IAYT) Accredited Program are required for full certification as a Yoga therapist. Each pathway requires documentation and full description/proof of required hours for approval by IAYT.

Yoga therapy education requires a foundational understanding of yoga theory and practice, biomedical and psychological foundations, teaching and therapeutic skills, yoga therapy tools and their application, along with professional practice that includes legal, regulatory, ethical issues pertaining specifically to Yoga therapy. All Yoga therapy applicants must be current IAYT members and agree to the Code of Ethics, Grounds for Disciplinary Action and Use of the C-IAYT Credential, and review the Scope of Practice.

That said, Yoga Alliance Registry’s Code of Conduct includes the following commitment, binding on all registrants in that no Yoga Alliance Registered Yoga School (RYS) or Registered Yoga Teacher (RYT) may rely on or use their RYS or RYT designations to hold themselves out as qualified to work as a “Yoga therapist” or to train others in “Yoga therapy” methods. Only a Certified International Association of Yoga Therapist can train others in Yoga therapy and through an IAYT accredited program.

In marketing or advertising materials that are independent of the Registry directory, an RYT or RYS that references “Yoga therapy” services or training must identify the source (other than Yoga Alliance Registry) of certification, accreditation, licensure, or other credential on which they base their “Yoga therapy” offerings.

As Yoga therapy evolves, the IAYT, recognized as the as the governing body for yoga therapists based on evidenced-based practice and peer reviewed literature, standards of practice that differentiate between a Yoga therapist and Yoga teacher are now emerging.

 

For those interested in Yoga therapy for eating disorders, whether or not your ultimate goal is a C-IAYT credential, please join us in Nicaragua in February 2018-more information here!