The New and Lonesome Registered Dietitian – Honing Support in Your Respective Treatment Setting

If you are a registered dietitian new to practicing in the eating disorder field or practice solo, this post is for you!

The New and Lonesome Registered Dietitian – Honing Support in Your Respective Treatment Setting

via On and Off the Mat by Beverly Price, RD, MA, E-RYT 200, C-IAYT, CEDRD-S | MemberSHARE

Yoga Therapy for a Client with Binge Eating Disorder

In my experience in working with individuals diagnosed with binge eating disorder, they like to move their bodies strongly on various days, with slower gentle postures on other days. From a Yoga therapy perspective, the Yoga treatment plan will vary from client to client.

This completes Beverly Price’s International Association of Eating Disorders (iaedp) Expert Guest Blogger series on Yoga Therapy across the Eating Disorder Spectrum

http://membershare.iaedp.com/on-and-off-the-mat-oct-blog-by-beverly-price/

 

 

Eating Disorder Recovery and Getting the Most out of Your Yoga

Yoga is becoming an integral part of eating disorder treatment whether you are struggling with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder and regardless if you are in a residential, partial or outpatient level of care.

Your client’s relationship with food and all other relationships parallels their experience on their Yoga Mat.

via ED Recovery and Getting the Most Out of Your Yoga

On and Off the Mat by Beverly Price, RD, MA, E-RYT 200, C-IAYT, CEDRD-S | MemberSHARE

This is the second article in the series. Learn about Yoga therapy for bulimia nervosa.

via On and Off the Mat by Beverly Price, RD, MA, E-RYT 200, C-IAYT, CEDRD-S | MemberSHARE

On and Off the Mat with Beverly Price, RD, MA, E-RYT 200, C-IAYT, CEDRD-S | MemberSHARE

For your client with an eating disorder, the benefits of yoga can be a powerful tool to uncover attachments and move these individuals forward with awareness. By observing and recording body language, including the client’s resistance, the Yoga therapist can become in tune to what is going on with the client in the moment and consult with the treatment team.

For your client with an eating disorder, the benefits of yoga can be a powerful tool to uncover attachments and move these individuals forward with awareness.  By observing and recording body language, including the client’s resistance, the Yoga therapist can become in tune to what is going on with the client in the moment and consult with the treatment team.

via On and Off the Mat with Beverly Price, RD, MA, E-RYT 200, C-IAYT, CEDRD-S | MemberSHARE

“To the Bone” – Professional Review of the Netflix Movie

All in all, To the Bone focused on recovery, while it has initiated the needed conversation around eating disorders and its addictive nature. If we continue to shove this topic under the rug – this disease that affects millions of individuals – then we perpetuate its “disorder,” and it becomes as secretive as the sickness itself.

We glorify movies that highlight shootings, killings and violence. Shows featuring those addicted to drugs and alcohol are now mainstream. When it comes to documentaries about individuals struggling with eating disorders, these features become the white elephant in the room.

In the eating disorder community, there has been much drama around the recently released, To the Bone, featuring Lily Collins and Keanu Reeves. The greatest concern has been the potential of the film to “trigger” those who are currently struggling with an eating disorder.

As a certified eating disorder specialist, who previously owned and operated an eating disorder treatment center prior to its acquisition, our former treatment team would not walk on eggshells to prevent our clients from being “triggered.” Triggers are a part of everyday life, and it is the job of a competent professional working in an eating disorder treatment setting to acclimate clients to triggers. Triggers are not bad, they exist to push our clients to become aware, along with grow and transform.

If you feel your clients will be triggered by watching this and similar documentaries, ask yourself:

“What makes you uncomfortable as a treatment professional, and why?”, “What do you identify personally with in the respective triggers?”, and “Are you invested in the recovery process of your clients?”

When informational programs regarding diabetes and/or heart disease are featured on television, do medical professionals become concerned that these programs could trigger those individuals who are afflicted with these conditions? I think not.  Our clients with eating disorders don’t walk around with blinders. We are not shielding them from anything they don’t already know.

Our clients want to be pushed. They don’t want to be handled with kid-gloves. It is our job to continue push their buttons. An astute eating disorder practitioner is not one that receives rave reviews because they were good listeners and colluded with their patients. A skilled eating disorder professional receives reviews that exude, “My therapist/doctor challenged me and pushed me out of my comfort zone. I often left our session in tears…and gained insight.”

The film did not clarify for the audience what was unconventional about Dr. Beckham’s treatment approach. In addition, although diversity of individuals with eating disorders were portrayed – vs the stereotype – along with eating disorders across the spectrum, Anorexia Nervosa was still highlighted as the top of the food chain per usual.

All in all, To the Bone focused on recovery, while it has initiated the needed conversation around eating disorders and its addictive nature. If we continue to shove this topic under the rug – this disease that affects millions of individuals – then we perpetuate its “disorder,” and it becomes as secretive as the sickness itself.

Mindfulness – Tools to Assist the Registered Dietitian in Working with Clients who have Eating Disorders

Many eating disorders coexist with other mental disorders such as
depression. Studies have discovered that mindfulness can bring out
positive emotions and suppress negative emotions and stress…

Scenario
Mindfulness is defined as maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness
of thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment.
It also means being aware of these thoughts and feelings without
passing judgment on oneself. Its origins come from a Buddhist
meditation practice and philosophy. Mindfulness is considered an
effective practice with or without the religious context of Buddhism6.
The objective of mindfulness is to live a life that is more internally
centered, meaningful, and with deeper inner peace by using its
practices.

Continue reading Beverly Price’s article here, as written for Academy of Nutrition, Sports, Cardiovascular, and Wellness Nutrition (SCAN), Disordered Eating and Eating Disorders subgroup (DEED).