On and Off the Mat by Beverly Price, RD, MA, E-RYT 200, C-IAYT, CEDRD-S | MemberSHARE

This is the second article in the series. Learn about Yoga therapy for bulimia nervosa.

via On and Off the Mat by Beverly Price, RD, MA, E-RYT 200, C-IAYT, CEDRD-S | MemberSHARE

Diabetes and Eating Disorders: Yoga as an Adjunct

For someone struggling with diabetes and an eating disorder, Yoga can be a powerful adjunct to treatment. Read my article here-re posted from We are Diabetes:

http://www.wearediabetes.org/articles/166/diabetes-and-eating-disorders-yoga-as-an-adjunct

YOGA TEACHER VS YOGA THERAPIST – WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

As Yoga therapy evolves, the IAYT, recognized as the as the governing body for yoga therapists based on evidenced-based practice and peer reviewed literature, standards of practice that differentiate between a Yoga therapist and Yoga teacher are now emerging.

The International Association of Yoga Therapists defines Yoga therapy as, …The appropriate application of these teachings and practices in a therapeutic context in order to support a consistent yoga practice that will increase self-awareness and engage the client/student’s energy in the direction of desired goals. The goals of yoga therapy include eliminating, reducing, or managing symptoms that cause suffering; improving function; helping to prevent the occurrence or reoccurrence of underlying causes of illness; and moving toward improved health and wellbeing. Yoga therapy also helps clients/students change their relationship to and identification with their condition. The practice of yoga therapy requires specialized training and skill development to support the relationship between the client/student and therapist and to effect positive change for the individual.

While this sounds like what you may be experiencing at your Yoga studio or medical/wellness clinic, under the guidance of your Yoga teacher, there is a fine line that is greater than it appears. In addition to completing at minimum a 200- hour yoga teacher training, ideally credentialed through Yoga Alliance, a Yoga therapist has also completed at least an additional 300 hours of Yoga therapy training, through a formal Yoga therapy training program, which was begun prior to January 1, 2014 plus at least 150 hours of Yoga therapy client contact hours (applied and submitted to IAYT for approval by June 30, 2017.

If the Yoga practitioner has started a formal Yoga therapy training program January 1, 2014 or later, 800 hours of an International Association of Yoga Therapists (IAYT) Accredited Program are required for full certification as a Yoga therapist. Each pathway requires documentation and full description/proof of required hours for approval by IAYT.

Yoga therapy education requires a foundational understanding of yoga theory and practice, biomedical and psychological foundations, teaching and therapeutic skills, yoga therapy tools and their application, along with professional practice that includes legal, regulatory, ethical issues pertaining specifically to Yoga therapy. All Yoga therapy applicants must be current IAYT members and agree to the Code of Ethics, Grounds for Disciplinary Action and Use of the C-IAYT Credential, and review the Scope of Practice.

That said, Yoga Alliance Registry’s Code of Conduct includes the following commitment, binding on all registrants in that no Yoga Alliance Registered Yoga School (RYS) or Registered Yoga Teacher (RYT) may rely on or use their RYS or RYT designations to hold themselves out as qualified to work as a “Yoga therapist” or to train others in “Yoga therapy” methods. Only a Certified International Association of Yoga Therapist can train others in Yoga therapy and through an IAYT accredited program.

In marketing or advertising materials that are independent of the Registry directory, an RYT or RYS that references “Yoga therapy” services or training must identify the source (other than Yoga Alliance Registry) of certification, accreditation, licensure, or other credential on which they base their “Yoga therapy” offerings.

As Yoga therapy evolves, the IAYT, recognized as the as the governing body for yoga therapists based on evidenced-based practice and peer reviewed literature, standards of practice that differentiate between a Yoga therapist and Yoga teacher are now emerging.

 

For those interested in Yoga therapy for eating disorders, whether or not your ultimate goal is a C-IAYT credential, please join us in Nicaragua in February 2018-more information here!